Yeah, But is it Art? \\ Reviews

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Recounting the Facts: Time is not a line

time is not Revisiting the AIDS Crisis and the Ongoing Epidemic: Public Health Challenges in the 21st Century was a three part series organized by Visual AIDS and the New School. It included a public conversation between directors Jim Hubbard (United in Anger: A History of ACT UP) and David France (How to Survive a Plague) regarding their similar yet different films about AIDS activism in New York during the late 80s and into the 90s; and a panel discussion about TB, co-infection, and AIDS as a global issue.

by Ted Kerr April 18th, 2013

Dick Lit 101: Men Who Write Bestselling Literary Fiction and Why We Hate Them

 “This is the magical revelation of The Marriage Plot? What all those hours of page-turning amount to? All the hype for this Pulitzer Prize winning, Times Square billboard modeling, New York Times best-selling, Salinger-like voice of a generation and it turns out he’s trying to sell me some sort of trickle-down, 40 years too late, mansplained, mealy-mouthed lip service on the importance of female emancipation? And I’m to shudder and swoon at the contemporary tragedy of it all? Well, shit Jeffrey. What a waste of time.”

by Ella Boureau November 26th, 2012

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I Wave My Hands in Front of Me

  Aldrin on David Wojnarowicz’ The Waterfront Journals and blessed estrangement from the individual body : “In ‘Diaries of a Wolf Boy,’ the speaker describes himself as a ‘wolf child,’ someone raised in the ‘remote jungles or forests’ and dragged into ‘his schizo-culture, snarling and spitting and walking around on curled knuckles’”.

by Aldrin Valdez, April 11th, 2012

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Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom, Revisited

“I went see Salo at the IFC expecting a fight. The kind of “tune in, turn on, get creeped out” internal battle of sexual monsters. If you haven’t heard of Salo, it is Italian poet Pier Paolo Pasolini’s interpretation of the Marquis de Sade’s 120 Day’s of Sodom. Bizarre sexual rites, torture and murder  are committed by 4 powerful Italian collaborators on a group of young adolescents in a remote Italian villa at the tail-end of WWII, which is supposed to be some convenient metaphor for the perversity of fascism, capitalism and western power. The plan was to get hot and bothered, then worry what that meant afterwards. Preferably over margaritas…”

by Ella Boureau July 1st, 2012

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